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ST PETER'S CHURCH, LAMPETER

Site Details

© Copyright and database right 2019. All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey licence number 0100022206

NPRN 270

Map Reference SN54NE

Grid Reference SN5754448356

Unitary (Local) Authority Ceredigion

Old County Cardiganshire

Community Lampeter

Type of Site CHURCH

Broad Class RELIGIOUS RITUAL AND FUNERARY

Period 19th Century

Site Description St Peter's Church is situated in an extensive churchyard - used as a cemetary - on a raised site at the top of Church Street, a landmark in the local landscape. It was built between 1867 and 1870, replacing a building of 1821-2 and an even earlier church, apparently of largely medieval fabric which was first mentioned in 1291. Traces of the earlier structures can be observed amid the graves immediately south of the present church which occupies the site of an enclosure, about 40m in diameter, mentioned by Meyrick and depicted on the 1843 Tithe map; this may have housed the rectory/vicarage.
The present church, regarded as the finest Victorian church in the County, was built to designs of R.J.Withers, and replaced a poorly-built church of 1836-8 by W.Wittington of Neath. Built in High Victorian Gothic style with geometric plate-traceried windows, it is constructed of grey-brown snecked rubble stone with ashlar dressings, green slate roofs, terracotta ridge tiles and coped gables with stone cross finials. It consists of nave, three-bay lean-to south aisle, tall three-stage south-west tower with pyramidal cap over porch, lower chancel and lean-to south vestry. The interior is simple: tall proportioned High Victorian Gothic with big king-post and collar trusses to nave, denser scissor-rafters in the chancel.
Furnishings include original carved circular stone font and pulpit, and stone reredos with mosaic panels. An extensive range of stained glass, from c.1875 to c.1950, includes notable works by Wilhelmina Geddes (1888-1955) in the style of Harry Clarke of Dublin (1938), Kempe & Tower (1919), and R.J.Newbery (c.1901).

Sources:
Extracts from Cadw Listing description.
T.Lloyd, J.Orbach & R.Scourfield, Buildings of Wales: Carmarthenshire and Ceredigion (2006), p.480-1.

RCAHMW, 10 July 2015

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